​Editor's Note — Word of the Day: Resilience

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Merriam-Webster defines resilience as “an ability to recover from or adjust easily to misfortune or change.” The American Psychological Association says it is “bouncing back” from difficult experiences, including workplace and financial stressors. The resiliency of most of the world’s population currently is being tested in ways that were previously unimaginable.

From a business perspective, SearchCIO, an online news portal for IT executives, says resilience is an organization’s ability “to quickly adapt to disruptions while maintaining continuous business operations and safeguarding people, assets, and overall brand equity.” To The IIA’s new Global Board chairperson, Jenitha John, resiliency is not only about bouncing back, but also bouncing forward to a new state of being (see “Reimagining Resilience”).

This issue of Internal Auditor focuses on the technologies that are enabling companies to become and remain resilient. In this month’s “The State of Analytics Use,” Russell Stohr notes that although the pandemic has created disruption, “it has also created a tremendous opportunity for businesses to rethink their current perceptions of what is required to make the business run.”

Organizations that embraced data and new technologies before the crisis have had an advantage during the pandemic, but author Christine Janesko says it’s not too late for other firms. In “The Digitally Transformed Enterprise,” she writes, “Organizations that accelerate their digital transformation can still reap the benefits moving forward — and internal auditors can provide valuable assistance along the way.”

That assistance comes both in the form of monitoring the organization’s use of technology and using that technology within the audit function. In “The Artificially Intelligent Audit Function,” authors Kitty Kay Chan and Tina Kim consider how internal audit can refine their organization’s data management and analytics capabilities to revolutionize internal audit’s work. And, in “Trust in Technology,” author Neil Hodge explains how internal auditors can help monitor the use of cutting-edge tools to ensure consistency with ethical requirements and awareness of organizational risks.

A large part of being resilient is recognizing the need for change and taking the steps necessary to make change happen. Your magazine team has done just that. As we’ve been telling you, the magazine has evolved to a completely digital edition beginning with this issue. Let us know what you think at editor@theiia.org.

Finally, on a personal note, I’d like to bid a fond farewell to Gretchen Gorfine. Gretchen has been the production manager of the magazine for the past 29 years. She has decided to move on to the next chapter in her life, which includes a mountain view, a beach view, and more time with the grandchildren. She will be greatly missed, and we wish her nothing but the best.

Anne Millage
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About the Author

 

 

Anne MillageAnne Millage<p> Anne Millage is editor in chi​ef of <em>Internal Auditor</em> magazine and editorial director at The IIA.​​​</p>https://iaonline.theiia.org/authors/Pages/Anne-Millage.aspx

 

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