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​Taking the Lead on Blockchain

As the technology behind Bitcoin finds new uses, internal auditors must assess how the risks may impact the organization.

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​Internal auditors are no strangers to change, and change continues to transform even the most traditional of processes. The latest revolutionary innovation is blockchain. Initially the technology underlying digital currencies such as Bitcoin, blockchain is beginning to change processes across many industries. 

Like all new technologies, blockchain may produce innumerable new risks. Yet ultimately, it has the potential to help manage and mitigate many traditional audit risks. Internal auditors need to understand how blockchain may change business processes, determine the risks to the organization, and revisit audit processes and procedures to leverage the technology in their work. 

How It Works

A blockchain is effectively a type of decentralized database known as a distributed ledger. Unlike traditional databases, blockchains have no sole administrator. As each transaction is recorded, it is time-stamped in real time onto the "block." Each block is linked to the previous block, and each user has a copy of that block on his or her own device. That process effectively creates an audit trail. 

Blockchain is most notably used for transactions involving the buying or selling of digital currencies. Although the electronic encrypted audit trail is one by-product of the underlying technology of interest to internal auditors, another interesting side effect of the process is an accounting methodology called triple-entry accounting. Modern financial accounting is based on double-entry bookkeeping dating back to the 1400s. With triple-entry accounting, all entries for a given transaction are made to the blockchain to verify and document receipt of the transaction.Thus, triple-entry accounting blends traditional double-entry accounting with third-party validation. As such, this methodology potentially could vastly alter traditional accounting processes and the subsequent control activities, risk assessment, and monitoring activities.

Impact on Audit Process

Often, internal auditors must catch up with technologies that are already in place, making modifications to the existing audit plan arduous and further emphasizing the need for a dynamic and adaptable audit plan. The complexity and incremental cost associated with blockchain implementation creates additional risk to the organization, making it vital that auditors are involved from inception and not just after implementation when a final process must be audited. Other risks associated with blockchain include scalability constraints, new privacy and security risks, and the need to consider new regulatory requirements, many of which have not yet been promulgated.

Historically, auditors have been tasked with verifying the management assertions of existence, valuation, rights and obligations, completeness, and presentation and disclosure. The use of a distributed general ledger virtually eliminates the possibility of altering transactional data or inputting fictitious data, as the encrypted signatures of both parties involved in a given transaction are required. 

Even with recent media coverage of digital currency hacks, the supporting technology underlying blockchain continues to be touted as "tamper-proof," "validated," "secure," and "private." Hacks are possible on applications that use blockchain, just as on an organization's intranet. However, for a hack or data leak to occur, an attacker not only has to concurrently hack each user on the network, but also bypass encryption. Such an intrusion would be highly visible to those on the network. Internal auditors must perform comprehensive risk assessments to determine the likelihood, magnitude, and nature of potential threats as well as the appropriate preventive, detective, and corrective controls. 

In addition to the data being more secure and valid, using a distributed public ledger gives auditors access to transactional data needed for the audit in real time, thus allowing for more continuous auditing. While continuous auditing has the potential to enable auditors to be more efficient, proactive, adaptive, and forward-looking, internal audit departments must explore the impact continuous auditing may have on existing audit programs and the potential disruption to the traditional audit cycle. Specifically, auditors must consider how it could impact scheduling, planning, and the actual collection of audit evidence.  

While blockchain would in no way be a substitute for U.S. Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 control testing, it could greatly increase the efficiency of traditional audits, creating a more uniform and highly verified audit trail from which to work. The improved quality of data and fewer reconciliations can potentially reduce the amount of work necessary throughout the year. Auditors may be able to conduct more work remotely, because less fieldwork will have to occur at the client's site. Moreover, efficiency gains from blockchain may enable internal auditors to focus on other high-risk areas such as internal control, compliance, or operational audits. 

Audit Implications

With the advent of blockchain, the nature of audit work may change pervasively. Potential changes to consider include: 

  • Systematically less reliance on paper documentation that can be altered or falsified easily. Matching and vouching to test for existence and appropriate valuation may largely be outdated, as auditors will have easy access to transactional data that already has been mutually agreed upon and verified by an independent third party.
  • Differing cybersecurity risks and controls. As the use of blockchain makes data available to everyone on the network, both physical and logical access controls will be more important than ever. In addition, use of a distributed public ledger can decrease the risk of successful computer attacks and may increase the visibility of attacks. The increased visibility elevates the importance of an organization's incident response plan.   
  • More involvement in creating new processes based on blockchain technology. As recent publications from the Big 4 firms note, the reliance on blockchain technology may require auditors to collaborate with IT professionals and raise the demand for auditors with IT expertise. Subsequent documentation of new processes and changes to old processes are key controls that auditors should not overlook. Over time, the use of blockchain may lead to increased standardization in both business processes and audit processes across industries as best practices emerge. 

Risks and Rewards

To prevent or lessen the risk of crisis that often precedes imminent change, internal auditors must stay abreast of emerging technologies such as blockchain. Yet, as with many new technologies and processes, blockchain may present a steep learning curve for auditors. Understanding the underlying technology of a distributed public ledger can enable auditors to assess the new control environment and new risks to the organization. In this way, internal auditors can be change agents who help mitigate the negative risks that all too often accompany the rewards associated with any new technology.​

Jamie L. Hoelscher
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About the Author

 

 

Jamie L. HoelscherJamie L. Hoelscher <p>Jamie L. Hoelscher, PHD, CIA, CFE, is an assistant professor of accounting at Southern Illinois University–Edwardsville.</p>https://iaonline.theiia.org/authors/Pages/Jamie-L.-Hoelscher.aspx

 

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