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​Selling Enterprise Risk Management

“Competing with an edge” is the ultimate aspirational value proposition.

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​Although enterprise risk management (ERM) has a compelling value proposition, it may not always be intuitive to key stakeholders. That often is because the benefits of ERM are not easily observable or clearly quantifiable in the near term. As risk management professionals, internal auditors are easily sold on ERM’s merits because of our role in the third line of defense. We live and breathe risk management governance daily. But internal auditors and other risk professionals engaged in ERM efforts, by nature, do not tend to have strong sales competencies. So, when we propose ways to advance ERM principles to organizational leadership, the message often misses the mark.

The ability to convince stakeholders of ERM’s value may be the difference between an ERM program that flounders as a check-the-box compliance activity and one that develops into a strategic governance asset. It is vital for internal auditors and other risk management professionals to have a compelling and polished value proposition pitch in their ERM toolbox — one that is intuitive and presentable in terms and language that first and second line of defense managers will embrace.

Risk management is not a new idea, and most business professionals understand its importance. However, some are skeptical, writing ERM off as unnecessary or an academic theory that is unproven in the real world. When this skepticism is not based on an informed position, it is a shortsighted and misguided viewpoint that creates a major cultural barrier when attempting to implement or mature an ERM program. This is when ERM professionals need to be at their best as salespeople.

Just as professional athletes strive for a competitive edge, business professionals also should pursue measures to enhance their success. ERM can provide the same type of competitive edge that athletes get from personal trainers, data analytics, and other measures. But ERM benefits are realized when organizations appreciate, understand, and embrace the ERM value proposition. For an organization to unlock the potential of ERM as a strategic asset, a key element is a concise value proposition that leaders and managers can easily buy into.

Step 1: Start at the top. ERM programs are most successful when executive leadership supports them. The ERM value proposition must be understood at the highest management levels. But beyond that, leadership must be compelled to embrace ERM. Only then will leaders develop a vision for pursuing implementation with the requisite energy. Leaders will only embrace ERM when there is a clear value proposition.

Step 2: Don’t oversell. Internal audit must be careful not to sabotage ERM momentum by overpromising what the ERM value proposition can deliver. ERM will not solve all strategic risk management challenges. This message must be communicated with stakeholders by setting realistic expectations about what the organization can achieve. ERM implementation will inevitably encounter failures along with successes.

Step 3: Make the case for ERM by appealing to its intuitive nature. Internal audit should start by making a simple and intuitive case to legitimize ERM. Various entities have given ERM credibility by embracing its virtues. These include regulators (e.g., board requirements for risk oversight), credit rating agencies (e.g., ERM used as rating criteria by S&P and Moody’s), and major universities (e.g., ERM academic programs at North Carolina State University and St. John’s University). Additionally, ERM’s qualitative value is intuitive, as outlined in the waterfall diagram below.

Step 4: Draw a distinction between traditional risk management and ERM. All business professionals manage risk. Managers oversee various business functions and manage the risk inherent in these functions. Human resources (HR) managers manage HR risk, finance managers manage finance risk, and so on. The problem with this risk management model is that it does not promote an enterprise view of risk. Risk managers in these siloed functions make risk management decisions that can have negative impacts in other functional areas.

ERM is not designed to replace the traditional risk management model, but rather to enhance it by bringing greater visibility to risk management activities and impacts across functional silos. This is done by implementing risk management processes to methodically and purposefully identify, respond to, and monitor risks at the enterprise level.

Step 5: Make ERM a tool for aspirational risk management excellence. Compliance benefits may be an acceptable outcome for some organizations, but the real value of ERM is realized when its focus is more strategic. There are three imperatives of a strategic ERM value proposition:

  1. Make informed decisions. ERM should support organizational decision-making for strategic planning, tactical execution, budgeting, and risk oversight.
  2. Protect stakeholder value. ERM should protect key stakeholders from value erosion.
  3. Optimize risk outcomes. ERM should seek the best possible risk outcomes by improving the likelihood of achieving strategic and business objectives, reducing the impact of organizational threats and weaknesses, exploiting organizational strengths and opportunities, and lessening the duration and persistence of negative risk outcomes.

Aspirational and strategically designed ERM programs help organizations compete more aggressively in the marketplace. With the three imperatives in place, an organization is positioned to compete with an edge.

When designed to be a strategic governance asset, ERM facilitates advanced risk-taking capabilities and empowers a thoughtful, safe, and aggressive risk-taking approach. This can result in enhanced competitive agility and ultimately lead to enhanced organizational value.


Rick Wright
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About the Author

 

 

Rick WrightRick Wright<p>​​​Rick Wright is director, Operations Audit, at Kansas City Southern Railway in Missouri and an adjunct professor at Webster University.</p>https://iaonline.theiia.org/authors/Pages/Rick-Wright.aspx

 

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