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​Don't Overlook Physical Access​

Internal auditors need to evaluate how facilities are protected as part of the organization’s overall security efforts.​


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In the digital age, security risks have become a rising concern for boards, management, and chief audit executives. They have responded to technology advances and growing cyber threats by focusing on controlling access to data, networks, and systems — known as logical security. That focus on logical security often comes​ at the expense of attention to physical security around buildings, facilities, equipment, and other areas. 

Physical and logical access are closely intertwined and combine to provide a higher level of security throughout the organization. Both types of access control are key to risk mitigation efforts to protect systems and data. Moreover, physical access can have a great impact on the effectiveness of logical access controls. Internal auditors need to focus on the basics and include physical access in their audit plans to ensure that the organization is protected adequately.

What’s at Risk?

Physical security is one of the most critical components of the overall security landscape. Weak physical security controls expose organizations to greater risk of failure of other controls. Recent incidents have shown that even with the strongest controls around logical security and intrusion detection, organizations continue to be exposed to the risk of unauthorized access in the absence of strong physical access controls.

Physical security risks are unique to each organization and depend on the size, geographical spread, and type of assets that need to be protected. Internal auditors often consider enterprise systems and data to be the primary assets that are vulnerable to physical security risks. That list must be expanded to include property, office buildings, warehouses, utility rooms, machinery, equipment, and vehicles as well as employees, contractors, and visitors. 

The broader risks resulting from the lack of effective physical access controls include inappropriate and unauthorized access to information, theft, vandalism, inappropriate actions from rogue employees or angry customers, accidents, and terrorism. While important for every organization, the consequences when physical security controls are compromised may be greater for data centers, defense-related organizations, educational institutions, hotels, hospitals, and retail businesses.

The Audit Plan

Including physical security audits in the annual audit plan can help ensure the organization is taking a more structured approach to mitigating security risks. Auditors also should provide assurance that management has performed a physical security threat assessment. Physical security audits should cover several areas.

Governance and Oversight Auditors should start by evaluating policies and procedures, oversight, risk assessments, training, and other processes that are in place to facilitate strong physical controls. Effective governance typically indicates a solid foundation for oversight and controls. 

Ownership and accountability of physical access can sometimes be murky. Roles and responsibilities of security personnel, property management, data management, and IT overlap and are interrelated. Generally, the IT team supports and helps manage identity and access management programs, but a different business unit may be responsible for physical access. The effectiveness of physical access controls depends on the collaboration among all the affected groups.

Physical Access Control Layers The first step in protecting against physical access threats is developing the ability to keep unauthorized individuals off the organization’s property. In assessing physical access controls, internal auditors should test the effectiveness of perimeter barriers such as fences, walls, or gates; protective lighting; alarm systems; communications systems; vehicle identification and control systems; and guard systems. As auditors move beyond perimeter considerations to review specific buildings, they should test other key controls such as security alarm systems, cameras, motion detectors, turnstiles, door locks, and badging systems. 

Despite the most sophisticated personnel identification and control processes, piggybacking is still a huge concern. Piggybacking refers to when an unauthorized person follows behind another person who is authorized to gain entry into a restricted area or past a checkpoint. Internal auditors must ensure that the organization is taking enough measures to restrict access by unauthorized individuals until their identity is confirmed by on-site security personnel. Auditors can review training and communication about piggybacking and even observe this process during busy entry times.

Within each building, internal auditors should inspect elevator and stairwell access, as well as evaluate whether individual and conference room doors have appropriate locking mechanisms. Rooms that contain valuable or sensitive information and other assets should be adequately protected to prevent access by unauthorized personnel.

Internal auditors should evaluate these multiple layers of controls carefully to ensure they are strong enough from both preventive and detective aspects. All these systems should be integrated with each other. For example, many organizations use a human resources database called Active Directory to validate an employee’s access credentials in real time.

Monitoring Internal auditors should assess whether the organization has effective monitoring controls in place to review the logs created from various monitoring systems. This information can ensure that the organization investigates and remedies all relevant incidents timely. In case of a breach, facilities, IT, information security, human resources, and legal teams must collaborate as a formal committee to discuss the incidents, analyze the root cause from investigations, and take remedial action. Internal auditors can review minutes from these committee meetings to evaluate their content and the effectiveness of their remedies.

Internal Audit’s Next Steps

Going forward, internal audit should integrate physical security into the department’s risk assessment process to ensure it gets adequate overall coverage in the annual audit plan. It is important for auditors to evaluate whether the current plan integrates physical security audit steps into relevant audit programs. 

As they develop the audit plan and perform the risk assessment, auditors should schedule meetings with facility and security personnel to learn about past incidents and get a sense of risk exposures in this area. From there, they should meet with the relevant stakeholders to discuss the current logical controls and determine how much logical and other controls depend on physical controls. By following these steps and recommending effective physical security controls, internal auditors also can help strengthen the organization’s overall security profile.  ​

Manoj Satnaliwala
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About the Author

 

 

Manoj SatnaliwalaManoj Satnaliwala<p>​Manoj Satnaliwala, CIA, CISA, CPA, CA, is chief audit executive and senior vice president, Internal Audit, at Caliber Home Loans in Coppell, Texas.​</p>https://iaonline.theiia.org/authors/Pages/Manoj-Satnaliwala.aspx

 

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